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Learning Rewired Season 2

#05 Trusted Leadership

No other single aspect of managing behavior that has been measured has had as large an impact on profits as trust. Yet, this is a topic that is often overlooked.

In this podcast, our host Thiago Kiwi speaks with Dr John Blakey who is a global CEO coach and author, about trust and leadership.

In this episode, they speak about:

  • Ways to build trust in your team and organisation.
  • How to manage trust in a remote setting.
  • What to do when it’s broken or non-existing.
Listen to the Podcast
Meet our Guest

Dr John Blakey

Dr John Blakey is a global CEO coach, author of The Trusted Executive and Founder of The Trusted Executive Foundation, which helps CEOs create a new standard of leadership defined by trustworthiness.

John is considered an authority on trust and leadership and his expertise is sought-after by organisations and the media worldwide based on his experience as a corporate leader, entrepreneur and CEO coach.  With 20 years’ experience coaching CEOs and their teams along with his prize-winning research at Aston Business School when he interviewed 70 CEOs and surveyed over 500 board-level leaders, John knows how leaders can develop trust in themselves as a leader, build positive relationships with employees and lead truly transformational change within their organisations. This laser-like focus on trust helps leaders create purpose-led, high-performance cultures built on the values of trust and challenge.

Learn more about Dr John Blakey

In this Episode...

What are the elements of building trust? When you look at it academically and over 30 years of research, there are three key ingredients that have been identified, that together will create trust. The three ingredients are ability, integrity, and benevolence.
How do you build trust in a remote situation? Most of us are novices building trust in a virtual world. And I think that's where we have to think about making trust, explicit. So what I mean, by making it explicit is we have to make it explicit and intentional, we can't assume it's just going to happen. And that's where models can help. So if you want to make something a little bit more structured, and help people break it down and manage it in manageable chunks, models can help you do that.